NUHSA Updates

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  • 24 Jul 2014 4:42 PM | Beth Green (Administrator)

    NUHSA took to Shoreline City Hall to advocate for exempting affordable housing from transportation impact fees. Shoreline’s Transportation Master Plan calls for impact fees to be placed on new construction as of January 1, 2015. Without an exemption, non-profit agencies that build affordable housing would have faced additional financial barriers. Ed Sterner, a NUHSA board member and Public Policy Committee member, joined representatives from the Shoreline faith community, local social service and housing agencies, and concerned citizens speaking out at the July 21st City Council Meeting. NUHSA and others spoke about the need for affordable housing in our area and how fee exemptions are a way for the city to support affordable housing. Kayla Schott-Bresler, from the Housing Development Consortium which represents non-profit housing developers, testified that 26% of Shoreline renters spend more than 50% of their income for housing.  In the end, the strong advocacy from NUHSA and concerned individuals and agencies in the community helped the Council decide unanimously to grant non-profit housing developers an exemption to the transportation impact fees.  The ordinance defines affordability as not paying more than 30% of one’s income for housing. Income eligibility was set at 60% of the King County median income, which is $47,640 for a three person household.  

  • 24 Jul 2014 4:16 PM | Beth Green (Administrator)

     

    Did you know that Public Health - Seattle & King County is facing huge cuts that will close the Northshore, Auburn, Federal Way, and White Center Public Health Centers in January? Plus, here in East King Co. there will be a 2/3 cut to Family Planning Prevention services that prevent teen pregnancy and STDs. Concerned? Contact King County Executive Dow Constantine: dow.constantine@kingcounty.gov.

  • 23 Jul 2014 11:18 AM | Beth Green (Administrator)

    Affordable Housing Leads to Smarter Kids

    A new study finds a link between how much families spend on housing and children's intellectual ability.

    According to the study, kids' reading and math abilities suffered in families that spent more than half or less than 20 percent of their household income on housing. AP/Matt Rourke

     

    In the world of human services, everything is linked, and one of the main axles around which things connect and spin is stable, affordable housing. If ever there was any doubt about housing's importance, particularly where it relates to the healthy development of kids, a new study erases it.

    Looking at how much families spend on housing and then comparing that to a child's intellectual achievement, researchers at Johns Hopkins University found that though how much a family spent "had no affect on a child's physical or social health, when it came to cognitive ability, it was a game changer."

    In families that spent more than half their household income on housing, kids' reading and math abilities suffered, according to the study. At the same time, children in families that spent less than 20 percent of their income on housing also suffered cognitively. "It's worse when you pay too little and worse when you pay too much," says study author Sandra J. Newman, a Johns Hopkins professor of policy studies and director of the university's Center on Housing, Neighborhoods and Communities.

    Newman attributes this finding to the fact that families that spend more than 30 percent of their income on housing spend less on things like books, computers and educational outings. Meanwhile, families that don't invest enough in housing are likely living in rougher, probably more chaotic and challenging neighborhoods, which is not at all conducive to building basic brainpower. "The markedly poor performance of children in families with extremely low housing cost burdens undercuts the housing policy assumption that a lower housing burden is always best," says Newman. "Rather than finding a bargain in a good neighborhood, they're living in low-quality housing with spillover effects on their children's development."

    In other words, the sweet spot is right in the 30 percent range, says Newman. "Those families were spending significantly more on educational enrichment." They invested an average of almost $100 or more on their children, which she admits isn't a lot of money but is apparently enough to make a difference.

    The report -- which gauged kids' abilities not by standardized academic or IQ tests but by basic cognitive skill tests -- focused on families with incomes at or below 200 percent of the poverty level.

    None of its findings, of course, ought to be surprising to anyone: In order to learn, kids need nutritional food, a stable home environment, a decent night's sleep and an adequate cash flow for school supplies. Given that, the study's assertion that what families spend on housing had "no effect on a child's physical or social health" seems misguided. Maybe not directly, but as stated at the beginning, everything in the human services world is connected to everything else.

    Jonathan Walters | Senior Editor, Governing Magazine

  • 17 Jul 2014 2:28 PM | Beth Green (Administrator)

     Please Help! The $15 minimum wage increase is happening in Seattle, and we know it will affect wages throughout the region.  King County policy makers have asked us for estimates of the impact of human services programs in the region bringing their staff salaries up to this level. We want to be able to explain the complexities and the costs of implementing a $15 minimum wage and the impact if there is no additional funding to offset those costs.

    You may already be collecting some of this information at the request of King County.  That may make responding to these questions easier! However they are NOT asking what the impacts will be on services if cost offset funding is not provided.  This information is critical to help policy makers understand the potential impact of an unfunded mandate.

    For this reason we are asking you to do a preliminary “back of the envelope” estimate of the costs to implement a $15 minimum wage and send it in to us before Friday, August 1st.

    There are three pieces of info that would be most helpful:

    1.       How many FTE’s staff from your agency make less than $15.00 and will be affected? How much will it cost you to bring your staff to that level?

    2.       Are you concerned about the cost of equity adjustments for your employees who are currently close to the $15/hr. threshold, the issue which you may have heard referred to as “compression?”  How many additional FTE’s will be affected and at what cost?

    3.      Do you know what services would have to be reduced or eliminated if your agency implemented a $15 minimum wage without any new revenue to offset the costs?  Who are your program participants and what would the impact be on them if these services had to be reduced or eliminated?

    Your participation could impact funding for human services.  Please send your answers to these questions before Friday August 1st to Pam Raphael, pam@kingcountyalliance.com  


    Thank you,

    ~ Merril Cousin                     

       Executive Director, King County Coalition Against DV

       Co - Chair, King County Alliance for Human Services 

     

    ~ Mike Heinisch

       Executive Director, Kent Youth & Family Services

       Co - Chair, King County Alliance for Human Services   

  • 17 Jul 2014 2:07 PM | Beth Green (Administrator)

     Opening Doors Input

    The United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) and the Committee to End Homelessness in King County invite you to participate in an Opening Doors online survey.

    Background Information:
    Since the launch in 2010 of Opening Doors: Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness, USICH has been working together with local communities to change the trajectory of homelessness in America, with our progress documented in the reductions seen in the annual Point-in-Time Count data nationally.  This progress demonstrates that Opening Doors is the right Plan and that it sets forth the right set of goals and strategies. Opening Doors is working because we developed the Plan together and because around the country we are implementing it together. Opening Doors brings the right people to the table--providers, practitioners, policy-makers from every level of government, advocates, and people with firsthand experience of homelessness.
     
    We can see that our progress is accelerating and gaining momentum, but we also believe that every strategic plan should be a living document, strengthened by new information and lessons that are learned through its implementation.  For example, we further strengthened Opening Doors in 2012 through an amendment focused on youth homelessness and educational outcomes for children experiencing homelessness.
     
    Intent of the Forum:
    As USICH embarks on the fifth year of the implementation of Opening Doors, USICH is intending to amend Opening Doors again, incorporating the changes made through the previous amendment, as well as incorporating new information and strategies that reflect new data, approaches, and insights into what works to end homelessness. We want to make sure any amendment reflects the perspectives, insights, and lessons learned from communities across the country.  We have created an on-line forum at http://usich.uservoice.com/ through which you can share and vote for the ideas you think would have the greatest impact in an amendment to Opening Doors.
     
           
     
     Questions--Jessica.reed@usich.gov  
         

    end homelessness

  • 03 Jul 2014 2:06 PM | Beth Green (Administrator)

     

     NUHSA AmeriCorps VISTAs, Amy Pepper and Adriana Zazula, are starting a north King County-based professional network for volunteer managers. It is called Mini VAN. It is a subgroup of the Volunteer Administrator’s Network, a Seattle-based professional association for Volunteer Managers like yourself. This should be a great chance for to network, work on  professional development, and share (and get!) resources.

    Kick-off meeting July 23rd at Friends of Youth in Kirkland, 10 - 11:30 AM.

    This first meeting will be an informal ‘meet-n-greet’ followed by a group discussion to decide what facilitated discussion topics for the bi-monthly meetings.

     

    Questions about the group or VAN, feel free to email amy.nuhsa@gmail.com and adriana.nuhsa@gmail.com.

  • 03 Jul 2014 2:05 PM | Beth Green (Administrator)

     

    Did You Know The State of Washington Offers Tax Payer Relief?

    State law provides tax relief programs for older adults, the disabled and those on limited income of any age. Income, residency and other criteria apply. Certain medical and long-term care costs may be deducted to calculate disposable income. The exemption program is a grant and the amount of the tax reduction ranges from full to partial, depending on assessed value of the property and your income. The two deferral programs require repayment of the tax amount loaned when the home is sold, the applicant passes away (unless there is a qualifying survivor), the home is no longer used as a primary residence or the home owner chooses to leave the program. If you were not aware of the program, refunds for up to three prior years may be submitted.

    • ·        Senior Citizen /Disabled Property Tax Exemption Program - The exemption program provides a property tax reduction to qualified senior citizens and disabled persons.

    • ·        Senior Citizen/Disabled Property Tax Deferral Program – Under the deferral program, Washington State  pays the second installment of your property tax and special assessments, due October 31, after you have paid the first half due April 30. The Department of Revenue oversees the program and gives final approval. Think of this as a loan, allowing the State to pay part of your property taxes and assessments, in exchange for placing a lien on your property until the amount deferred, plus interest, is repaid.

    • ·        Property Tax Deferral Program for Homeowners with Limited Income- operates similarly to the deferral program for Senior Citizen /Disabled. Department of Revenue approves applications.

    Eligibility Requirements Senior Citizen Exemption Program

    • ·        Annual household income of $35,000 or less.

    • ·        Own and occupy a house, mobile home, condo or coop

    • ·        61 years of age by December 31 of the previous year, or

    • ·        Retired because of disability or

    • ·        Veteran with a 100% service connected disability

    • ·        You are a widow, widower or state registered domestic partner, at least 57 years of age, whose spouse or state registered domestic partner had an exemption at time of death.

    • ·        Refunds for prior years are available because of a mistake, oversight or not knowing about the  exemption program

    • ·        Must reapply every four years

    Eligibility Requirements Senior Citizen/Disabled Deferral Program

    • ·        60 or older or retired because of physical disability

    • ·        Income of $40,000 or less

    • ·        Owned property for  five years

    • ·        Have enough equity to secure the interest of the State of Washington

    • ·        The first half of your property taxes, due April 30,, must be paid before applying for the deferral on your second installment due October 31.

    • ·         Must reapply annually

    Property Tax Deferral Program for Homeowners with Limited Income

    • ·        Available to homeowners with disposable incomes of $57,000 or less

    • ·        Live in home for five years

    • ·        Have enough equity to secure the interest of the State of Washington

    • ·        State pays second installment of property taxes after homeowners pays first

    • ·        Must reapply annually

    The application deadline is September 1 of each year for the Limited Income Program and March 31st for Deferral Program. There is no deadline for the senior/disabled exemption application. For further information or to obtain an application, call the King County Assessor’s Office, 206-296-3920. Download applications at http://www.kingcounty.gov/Assessor/TaxpayerAssistance/TaxRelief.aspx

  • 03 Jul 2014 2:03 PM | Beth Green (Administrator)

     


    Monday, July 21st, 1:00 – 3:00 pm
    Seattle City Hall – Bertha Knight Landes room, 600 4th Ave., Seattle

    RSVP to jessica.reed@usich.gov no later than Wednesday, July 14, 2014.

    The United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) and the Committee to End Homelessness in King County are pleased to invite you to participate in an Opening Doors Input Forum to be held in Seattle on Monday, July 21st from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm at Seattle City Hall – Bertha Knight Landes room, 600 4th Ave.  Information on the forum is described in more detail below.  
     
     
    Background Information:
    Since the launch in 2010 of Opening Doors: Federal Strategic Plan to Prevent and End Homelessness, USICH has been working together with local communities to change the trajectory of homelessness in America, with our progress documented in the reductions seen in the annual Point-in-Time Count data nationally.  This progress demonstrates that Opening Doors is the right Plan and that it sets forth the right set of goals and strategies. Opening Doors is working because we developed the Plan together and because around the country we are implementing it together. Opening Doors brings the right people to the tableundefinedproviders, practitioners, policy-makers from every level of government, advocates, and people with firsthand experience of homelessness.
     
    We can see that our progress is accelerating and gaining momentum, but we also believe that every strategic plan should be a living document, strengthened by new information and lessons that are learned through its implementation.  For example, we further strengthened Opening Doors in 2012 through an amendment focused on youth homelessness and educational outcomes for children experiencing homelessness.
     
    Intent of the Forum:
    As USICH embarks on the fifth year of the implementation of Opening Doors, USICH is intending to amend Opening Doors again, incorporating the changes made through the previous amendment, as well as incorporating new information and strategies that reflect new data, approaches, and insights into what works to end homelessness. We want to make sure any amendment reflects the perspectives, insights, and lessons learned from communities across the country.  We have created an on-line forum at http://usich.uservoice.com/ through which you can share and vote for the ideas you think would have the greatest impact in an amendment to Opening Doors, but we also want to hear directly from you as a key partner and stakeholder in King County.
     
    This Opening Doors Input Forum will be facilitated by: Matthew Doherty, Director of National Initiatives and Katy Miller, Regional Coordinator from USICH. We’ve identified a few areas of the Plan where we are especially interested in receiving input, but please come ready to share your opinions and perspectives on how Opening Doors can be further strengthened and better support progress in King County. 
     
    RSVP Information:
    Space will be limited, so please RSVP to Jessica.reed@usich.gov no later than Wednesday, July 14th, 2014. 
     
    We hope that you will be able to participate in this important dialogue!

  • 03 Jun 2014 7:15 PM | Beth Green (Administrator)

     

    The City is kicking off the subarea planning process for the light rail station coming to N 145th Street with a Community Meeting/Design Workshop on Thursday June 12.

    We will follow a similar process as for the station coming to N 185th Street, which includes beginning with high-level brainstorming about what residents and other stakeholders would like to see or avoid as the neighborhoods transition over the next several decades following the introduction of light rail.  This initial workshop will be followed-up in the fall with a second Design Workshop to introduce potential zoning scenarios and computer models that will be built based on suggestions from the June 12 meeting.

    Unlike the planning process for the 185thStreet station, we are not scheduling individual stakeholder group workshops because we had very limited engagement.  Instead, we are inviting identified stakeholder groups to the Community Design Workshop (details below).  There is no need to RSVP for this event, but please feel free to contact me with any questions and forward this invitation to your organization’s distribution lists.  We hope you will join us to plan for the future of light rail and Shoreline neighborhoods, and how it can promote greater local housing affordability.

     

    Flyer:   145th_1 page flyer 6.12.14 Final.jpg

    Thanks,

    Miranda Redinger

    Senior Planner

  • 29 May 2014 6:52 PM | Beth Green (Administrator)

    Mark Putnam to Address NKC Affordable Housing and Homelessness Workgroup June 11th

    On June 11th, the Housing Development Consortium of Seattle-King County (HDC) will be convening its quarterly North King County Housing and Homelessness Workgroup Meeting. This month’s meeting will feature a discussion with Committee to End Homelessness Director Mark Putnum. We will also hear updates from the City of Shoreline and discuss human services funding in North King County. We hope you will join us from 11:30am-1:30pm in Room 303 at Shoreline City Hall for this meeting and opportunity to hear about CEH’s work. Please contact Kayla Schott-Bresler at kayla@housingconsortium.org or (206) 682-9541 with any questions.

    Kayla Schott-Bresler, Policy Associate

    Housing Development Consortium of Seattle-King County

    1402 Third Avenue, Suite 1230

    Seattle, WA 98101

    (206) 682-9541

    www.housingconsortium.org

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